News
Domson's Engineering Wins Property Award at Forbes Georgia 2019

On February 7, the Forbes Georgia Business Award Ceremony was held at the Sheraton Grand Tbilisi Metechi Palace. The winner of the nomination for Forbes Property is Domson's Engineering.

The company is a leader on  the Georgian market for electrical mechanical engineering. Since 2019, with the active development of the construction sector, the company offers a full range of services to the customers, including design, construction-engineering and fire safety consulting. Domson's Engineering projects are implemented by modern construction methodologies, innovative engineering solutions and high-efficiency materials. More than 500 people are currently employed on current projects.

The concept of energy efficient buildings is becoming more and more relevant in the developed countries. Domson's Engineering is positioned as a leader in this area, which is proved by regional projects, executed by Japanese brand Daikin's A+ class energy-efficient systems.

Daikin is the world's number one brand in air conditioning and ventilation, with annual turnover of $ 24 billion and employing 70,000 employees worldwide. Since 2012 Domson's Engineering represents the brand in Georgia and becomes a top distributor across Eastern Europe and Central Asia for the second time in a row.

Domson's Engineering has begun building its own hotel complex and elite villas. The project will be located on a 10 hectare area in Kakheti. The investment of the aforementioned development project is 20 million Georgian Lari.

Domson's Engineering collaborates with major companies such as Co-Investment Fund, IG Development, Silk Road Group, Evex, TBC and Alliance Group. The number of completed projects include: City Mall shopping centers, Evex clinics, Radisson Event Hall, Carrefour hypermarkets, etc.

As for the current projects, the company is building and executing engineering works for the complex Panorama Tbilisi, several five-star brand hotels, A-class business centers, and McDonald's.

In 2020, Domson’s plans to expand its service outside of Georgia, particularly in Uzbekistan, where the company plans to open the office. The first project will be an international brand hotel, which will be launched this year.

07.02.2020
International Recognition of a Georgian Company

Domson's Engineering  held a conference with international partners on February 7, 2019, at Rooms Hotel.

The event summarized the company's unprecedented steps in the field of engineering and celebrated the arrival of Daikin - the world's leading Japanese technology giant in Georgia.

Domson's Engineering is a leading engineering company in Georgia that implements A-class energy-efficient systems and NFPA international standards in major regional projects. The Georgian company has won the award of the best distributor of Japanese brand Daikin in Eastern Europe and Central Asia and continues to successfully collaborate with the world's leading technology brands.

Since its founding in 1924, Daikin has devoted itself with an unconstrained passion to overcome the ever-evolving challenges and become the leading manufacturer of air conditioning system and equipment. Leveraging its unique cutting-edge technology, Daikin delivers outstanding products and system solutions to ensure comfortable and sustainable living environments for people and all regions around the world. The company is actively manufacturing the A-class energy-efficient system of HVAC.

Representatives of the construction and development companies, international engineering companies, banking sector, diplomatic corps and the municipality of Tbilisi, attended the conference.

It must be noted that, on this day, a trilateral memorandum was signed between one of the capital's major projects - City Mall Saburtalo, Domson's Engineering and Daikin.

07.02.2019
World’s first solar road opens in France: It’s ridiculously expensive

The world's first solar highway has been opened in France, in the not-very-sunny village of Tourouvre au Perche in Normandy. The roadway is just one kilometer (0.6mi) long, but that still works out at 2,800 square meters of photovoltaic cells—enough, hopefully, to power the village's street lights.

The road was built by Colas, a large Anglo-French construction company. Colas has apparently been working on its own solar road tech, called Wattway, for at least five years. Wattway has been tested in car parks, but this is the first time it has been used on an active road. There will now be a two-year test period, to see if Wattway can withstand the rigor of being pounded by thousands of cars and trucks per day and whether it can actually provide a useful amount of electricity.
Usefulness aside, the main problem with constructing solar roads is their crippling cost. One of the main selling points of Wattway, according to Colas, is that each panel is just a few millimeters thick, and can thus be installed on top of an existing road, which in turn massively reduces construction costs. Having said that, the 1km road in Normandy cost €5 million (£4.3m) to build. And that's for a single lane of a two-lane highway!

Expanding that out to 10m per kilometer for a two-lane solar road, you're looking at a total cost measured in billions or even trillions of pounds to cover a sizeable portion of a country's roads with solar panels.

Fortunately, Ségolène Royal, France's ecology minister, has a much more reasonable goal in mind: she would like to see solar roadways replace one kilometer of every 1000 in France. Again, assuming she means two-lane solar roads at around €10 million per kilometer, the total cost would be €10 billion—not bad, assuming the panels (and the accompanying electrical system) don't need regular maintenance, and that they produce enough electricity to be worth the much higher initial outlay.

Indeed, their questionable efficiency is one of the main reasons that more solar roads aren't currently being built. Colas says that Wattway's photovoltaic efficiency is 15 percent, which is pretty good. But that doesn't take into account the fact that the solar panels are flat on the ground, rather than angled towards the sun's trajectory, significantly reducing efficiency at higher latitudes. Heavy traffic could also block sunlight; as could snow, mud, and perhaps standing water too after rain.

Obviously the maths are a bit better on the €5 million roads in Normandy, but that's still an awful lot of money to spend on powering the village's (population ~3,300) street lights.

The Wattway brochure suggests that 2,800 square meters of solar roadway ought to be able to power about 140 homes—about 420MWh per year. Though clearly, if they are just looking to power the village's street lights, they're not expecting anywhere near 420MWh in reality—perhaps due to the low amount of direct sunlight in Normandy.

 

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